A Case For Gravity

Simon

By a case for gravity, I don’t mean, what goes up must come down.

What I refer to is a case for dignity, for solemnity, because it appears that we have all but lost the capacity, or even the desire, to present with some sense of gravity – in our words, and our lives. 

I apply this to us, to God’s people, because who am I, who are we, to judge the world.[1]

The clamor to be heard, to express an opinion, overwhelms any sense of restraint and sobriety in much communication these days.

Yet, the greatest of people say less, not more. 

That is a hallmark of their greatness; less is more and more is less (more or less).

 

The prophet, Isaiah, speaking of the servant of the Lord when he was being oppressed and afflicted, said “so he opened not his mouth.”  He said it twice in the space of one verse.[2]  He talked less; we talk too much.  Isaiah also stated that the servant of the Lord, would not “cry aloud or lift up his voice, or make it heard in the streets.”[3]  The picture he paints in these verses is of someone who by extreme patience will bring forth justice. It isn’t saying he won’t speak, but that he wouldn’t push himself forward to be heard.

He (Jesus is the Servant) respected Synagogue protocol as to when he could speak.  He didn’t walk in and demand his messianic right to minister.  On the contrary, he told his disciples to walk away if their voice wasn’t heeded, which thing Paul did, ultimately.[4]   The gentle persistence of Jesus accomplished the will and purpose of his Father. He never craved the publicity of the miracles he accomplished in the power of the Holy Spirit.  However, I digress.

 

A case for gravity can and should be made for those that lead God’s people, his church.  We should be, need to be, described with words such as restraint, simplicity, dignity, and sober-mindedness.  These words are easily, but wrongly, interpreted to mean, boring, and out of touch.  But if they are (which they aren’t) then so be it because it is precisely these qualities that Paul sets out for anyone in leadership. They are the job description of the necessary qualities of God’s servants.[5]

The list of attributes Timothy is to employ placing leaders over God’s church has nothing in it that speaks of gifts or charisma.[6]  It is entirely character-based.  Nearly every word in these instructions portrays a dignified, well thought of, and self-disciplined person.

  • Sober-minded – not given to the fanciful. Reflective, not reactionary, neither thinking too much nor too little of oneself.
  • Self-controlled – control of appetites, needs, and wants. Calm under pressure; slow to react.
  • Respectable – showing grace towards and respect of others, having earned standing in the community, not given to extremes, nor consumptive of commodities.
  • Hospitable – a house open to others, one who welcomes, not exclusive but inclusive, the table is for all.[7]
  • Not a drunkard – not given to dissipation, able to enjoy what is legitimate but not captured by it; this is pleasure with restraint.
  • Not violent (but gentle) – able to resolve conflict without fists, not a physical bully, someone able to maintain peace under duress.
  • Not quarrelsome – no need to win arguments, especially to prove intellectual or academic superiority or make a point, a kind person, silent around fools and the contrary.
  • Not a lover of money (which is idolatry) – able to be the same person with or without whether in lack or in abundance, not deceitful, or a scammer/schemer.[8] Money is a gift to this person, not a possession.

 

What sort of person is this? 

It is a person who displays gravitas – maturity, and bearing.

Regal bearing need not be the domain of the aristocracy.  A person who expresses grace and kindness has gravitas, regardless of their social status.  Another word for this is dignity.  A dignified person is one who knows have to handle themselves in any setting – when to talk, when to be silent, when to come, when to go.[9]

It is a person who shows restraint.

They aren’t just restrained in being able to control their feelings so as not to spill invective on others, or lash out, but someone who doesn’t live over the top, who isn’t a walking advertisement for conspicuous consumption, who is careful not to belittle others with what they have and what others don’t.

Paul wrote to this last point in his letter to the Corinthians, where the poor and rich (both in God’s church) were advised how to do community together in such a way that the poor of God’s people got to eat at the same table in the house church/es as the rich.  The rich ate before the poor thus belittling them with the plenty they exclusively enjoyed, while the poor starved.  Paul said it was for this reason people were weak and ill, some having died.

Another word for restraint is simplicity.  How much do you need at any one time?  There is a place for God’s people in the West to examine our lives – how we live, how much we spend on the frivolous, the unnecessary.  Our consumeristic clutter is not to our advantage; it makes us no happier.  

A leader should live with restraint dictating parameters to decisions and lifestyles.

The New Testament gives good grounds for gravity in living – in appearance, speech, behavior, and lifestyle.  In fact, it is required of the leaders of God’s church.

This is my case for gravity.

Simon Circle Cropped

 

[1] I Corinthians 5:12-13.

[2] Isaiah 53:7.

[3] Isaiah 42:1-4.

[4] Acts 28:26-31.

[5] I Tim 3:1-13; Titus 1:5-9.

[6] We can rightly assume that gifts mattered, but character leads to competency.

[7] People disqualify themselves from leadership in God’s church who don’t open their arms and homes, as a lot of discipleship is done around the table.

[8] Paul’s claim to be able to do all things through Christ is premised on/contextualized by him being able to be in abundance or lack. Either way didn’t change him.  This takes strength.

[9] Dignity can at times be seen in deportment and appearance: not drawing attention yet well-groomed, fitting in yet not standing out – in a self-seeking manner.

Simon McIntyre
March 29, 2021

One Reply to “A Case For Gravity”

Margaret says:

Very wise words Pastor Simon.. a life with gravitas is one seeped in grace and dignity! Amen

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