Different Church Models

Blog Richard

‘They will know you are my disciples by the love you have one for another’ (John 13:35).

When Jesus called the first disciples to follow him, it was in the context of relationship. Jesus, in commissioning us to make disciples (Matt 28:19), is commissioning us to be building community: the church.

 

But what is the best model for establishing a new church?

The revelation of Christ is the foundation of all church planting – ‘by wisdom a house is built, and through understanding it is established’ (Proverbs 24:3).

When I think “how-to” or which is the best model to apply, I think R.E.S.T

  1. Reason: what we can examine, study and test intellectually
  2. Experience: what we can feel and emotionally sense
  3. Scripture: what is revealed in the word of God, both descriptively and prescriptively
  4. Tradition: what has worked before and what the Lord has used previously

Scripture is not the only source of understanding and wise judgment, but it ought to be the non-negotiable plumb line.

 

From reason:

We understand “not all trees in the forest are the same height but every tree is important.” We understand that a dynamic, diverse, and supportive ecosystem needs less artificial fertilizers than a single monoculture limited in genetic strength. Therefore, the diversity of models is not only to be expected but encouraged and celebrated.

From experience:

Our personal experiences teach us that no “one size fits all.”

From Scripture:

There were culturally homogeneous churches, such as the church in Jerusalem and Corinth, and there were diverse cultural churches like Ephesus. There were small churches – the church in Colossae had no more than 50, in Philippi under 150, in Ephesus many thousands – yet every church was important and given great attention from leaders like Paul.

From tradition:

There have been great churches of all sizes big and small. Throughout history, the predominant church size has been approximately 100 members. We plan for the norm, adjust for the exception, and celebrate all.

 

 

Learnings from C3

Mark Kelsey at Presence Conference in 2019 outlined a description of types of churches in C3. His list included urban, suburban, regional, churches in remote regions, churches in developing countries, and churches in regions of persecution. All with the same C3 culture but with various approaches.

The following are some approaches we have used (the headings are for description only):

 

The hub church

A team of pastors travels between 3 to 5 churches of up to 70. C3 Reach Bangladesh churches use this approach. We identify an evangelist, a pastor, and a manager. The evangelist goes into a new area followed by the pastor, then the manager coordinates all the hubs.

The reverse church

This approach is used in locations where believers are persecuted and the safest place to worship & teach is in homes. This can lead to isolation and a lack of accountability. We reserve the order in the west where we worship and teach in larger groups and fellowship in homes. The larger gathering is for fellowship and socializing only and the smaller groups are for teaching and worship. C3 Reach Egypt uses this approach.

The satellite hub

Establish one large central church and create smaller satellite churches each 1 to 5 hours away from the central church. Each satellite church has a pastor and a core team, and they visit once a month. C3 Reach Kazakhstan uses this model.

The home church network

In extremely dangerous situations, the only possibility is to have churches under 30 that meet in homes. Once every month, the pastors of the home church gather either online or in person.

 

Eight things that are present in the gatherings of all the models are:

  1. Intentional prayer and worship
  2. Preaching/teaching the word
  3. Communion
  4. Community Evangelistic activities – including practical acts of service
  5. Development of the leader and monthly reporting to the supervisor
  6. Regular social activities
  7. Intentional focused development of ‘next leaders of the next plant’
  8. Intentional connection to other C3 churches

 

Defining the “how to do”

Rather than starting with a pre-set model, we start with a process of formational questions:

  • “What are the broader cultural values in the context we are planting?”
  • “What is the outcome we want?”
  • “What do we need to do to achieve this outcome?”
  • “What will it look like if we do the things we need to do?

If you are interested in the material we use, you can contact us at c3churchryde.com.au.

 

Effective delivery of the gospel requires integration between form (what is seen), function (what we do), and feeling (what we desire others to experience).

Ultimately our perfect model is Jesus and our methods focus on how we can be Spirit-powered and connect-driven in the specific cultural context.

Richard Green Circlepic

Richard Green
August 12, 2020

2 thoughts to “Different Church Models”

Jenelle says:

Very good Richard. Thank you.

Awesome insights and revelation Richard, thank you

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