Psalm 19

Simon Psalm
A theme consistent with, and constantly repeated by, scripture is the goodness and majesty of God’s creation, attested so beautifully in Psalm 19.

 

The heavens declare the glory of God,
and the sky above
 proclaims his handiwork.
Day to day pours out speech,
and night to night reveals knowledge.
There is no speech, nor are there words,
whose voice is not heard.
Their voice
 goes out through all the earth,
and their words to the end of the world.
In them he has set a tent for the sun,
which comes out like a bridegroom leaving his chamber,
and, like a strong man, runs its course with joy.
Its rising is from the end of the heavens,
and its circuit to the end of them,
and there is nothing hidden from its heat.

The law of the LORD is perfect,
reviving the soul;
the testimony of the LORD is sure,
making wise the simple;
the precepts of the LORD are right,
rejoicing the heart;
the commandment of the LORD is pure,
enlightening the eyes;
the fear of the LORD is clean,
enduring forever;
the rules
of the LORD are true,
and righteous altogether.
More to be desired are they than gold,
even much fine gold;
sweeter also than honey
and drippings of the honeycomb.
Moreover, by them is your servant warned;
in keeping them there is great reward.

Who can discern his errors?
Declare me innocent from hidden faults.
Keep back your servant also from presumptuous sins;
let them not have dominion over me!
Then I shall be blameless,
and innocent of great transgression.

Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart
be acceptable in your sight,
O LORD, my rock and my redeemer.

 

This Psalm has been divided into three segments that follow on one from the other: verses 1-6, 7-11, and 12-14.

 

Psalm 19:1-6

Psalm 19:1-6 speaks as though creation itself talks – which it does.  It tells us, loud and clear that the heavens, and the sky above, declare and proclaim God’s glory and handiwork.  Who could doubt this looking at the night sky, especially when unimpeded by the ambient light of cities?  The heavens are spectacularly glorious, strewn with glory like diamonds scattered on midnight blue.  The colours of the nebulae and the galaxies pale the finest of the Great Masters palettes.  A Real Master has been at work here.

Creation speaks to us; it is telling us of God’s majesty, His goodness, and power – exemplified in the sun, which is portrayed as a strong man running his course with joy.  What a magnificent and vibrant description.

 

Psalm 19:7-11

Psalm 19:7-11 develops this theme of Creation talk stating that, even though God is apprehended in creation, he is known more clearly and perfectly as he speaks and reveals himself in scripture.  In other words, creation is good, but his law is perfect.  God speaks of himself in what we see, but God speaks transformatively to us in what we hear.  Creation doesn’t redeem us; his word, his law does.

The Psalmist sees delight and joy in his Law; as these verses list the many wonderful ways that God’s word speaks to us:  it revives, it makes wise, rejoices the heart, and it enlightens. This is because his law is: perfect, sure, pure, true, righteous, more valuable than gold, sweeter than honey, a warning, and a reason for reward.

 

Psalm 19:12-14

Creation speaks in declarative terms (V1-6), the Law of Lord is perfect and transformative (V7-11), and now the final part of the Psalm speaks to the inner person, the hidden person, the compromised person.  These verses invite the Lord to look inside of us, into the ruin of the human condition, asking him to moderate and tell us what we don’t and can’t know of ourselves, because of the deceptiveness of the human heart.  The Psalmist’s prayer is that the Lord would keep him, and by inference us, from errors, hidden faults and presumptuous sins.  It is these that obfuscate the pictures of creation and law.

We may know of God in his creation, and experience him in his word, yet we don’t truly know ourselves.  Only God does.  It isn’t just a Creator we need to know and appreciate, it is a Redeemer, the Lord, we must experience – my rock and my redeemer.  Only he can keep us from the folly and danger we pose to ourselves.

 

Psalm 19 directs us to contemplate God’s majesty in creation and see him in the perfection of his law.  But it also reminds us of the all too human creatures we are, and our need for a redeemer, one who knows, one who sees and saves. 

We can look upon the heavens in awe, agree with the wonder of his Law, and yet hardly know ourselves.  To this end, David’s heartfelt prayer in the last stanza of this Psalm is that we would be kept from the danger we are to ourselves, from faults and sins that have dominion over us.

His prayer is that our words would be acceptable, as the words of God are – the words of creation and the words of the law of God.

 

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Simon McIntyre
February 23, 2021

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