The Biblical Basis Of Expansion Part I

Tuesday 10th

 

Planting churches is not an option for the adventurous – it is a mandate for all of God’s church.

In this mandate we see mirrored, or, more properly, fulfilled, the creative and obligatory decree of Genesis 1:28 – that of being fruitful and multiplying. The authority given in this original proclamation is given new impetus, authority and focus in the words of Jesus that all authority in heaven and earth has been given to him[1]. That is why we can and should Go.  We are participating by the expansion of churches in the New Creation project of God.

The making of disciples, the last command of the Risen Christ[2], is best accomplished in the expansion and formulation of new churches/locations/campus – the fact being more important than the form.

The prophet Isaiah called out:

Enlarge the place of your tent,

and let the curtains of your habitation be stretched out;

do not hold back; length your cords

and strengthen your stakes.

For you will spread abroad to the right and to the left,

and your offspring will possess the nations,

and will people the desolate cities.[3]”

 

These verses have long captured the prophetic imagination of C3 Churches, and in particular Ps Phil Pringle.  They have provided vision and focus.  And it is these two things that are essential to enlarge, stretch, strengthen and possess.  Vision is necessary to fulfil the mandate, and focus is required to give legs to vision.

At one juncture in the history of the early church it was persecution that forced the church’s hand to, “go and make disciples.”

They were forced to relocate around the Empire, taking the good news with them and forming loose communities, which became the seedbed/precursors to the eventual establishment of churches under the more deliberate intentionalized apostolic ministry of Paul and Barnabas (and others).

It has been sagely stated that the hope of the world is the local church.  (And so it was, and so it is, and so it will be.)  He meant that as we expand and gather God’s people we are providing hope for the world, the country, the community we find ourselves in.  It was the gospel embodied (incarnated) in the life of the believers that became the reason for the triumph of faith in the Roman Empire.[4]  Love verses power, and love won.

Ed Stetzer states, “Any church wishing to recover the dynamic nature of the early church should consider planting new churches.[5]

Whilst recovering the dynamic of the early church may be a little more nuanced than Stetzer’s comment accounts for, we would be well advised to, at least, make a start by doing what he does suggest.  New life engenders new life.

The temptation to only maintain what we have may well be irresponsible, and at very least negligent as it tends towards atrophy.

By nature most of us are conservative; we find expanding a stretching exercise, not always comfortable – and neither is it.  But the call of being in Christ asks something more of us, more than we think we are capable of, more than seems reasonable, and more than becoming less – as that is what we will become it we don’t think and live out, if we don’t some how, some day, Go.

 

This blog is part of our online church planting resource base. To find out more, ask your senior pastor for access to Xpress

 

[1] Matthew 28:18

[2] Matthew 28:19-20

[3] Isaiah 54:2-3 (ESV)

[4] I highly recommend Rodney Stark’s, The Rise of Christianity. (New York, NY: HarperOne, 1997).  He is a sociologist/historian with unique insights.

[5] Ed Stetzer, and Daniel Im. Planting Missional Churches: Your Guide to Starting Churches That Multiply. Second edition. (Nashville, Tennessee: B&H Academic, 2016), 42

Simon McIntyre
August 9, 2019

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